Mars’ Growth Stunted by an Early Giant Planet Instability

Matthew Clement Nathan A. Kaib 1 Sean N. Raymond 2 Kevin J. Walsh 3
2 ECLIPSE 2017
LAB - Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Bordeaux [Pessac]
Abstract : Many dynamical aspects of the solar system can be explained by the outer planets experiencing a period of orbital instability. Though often correlated with a perceived delayed spike in the lunar cratering record known as the Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB), recent work suggests that this event may have occurred during the epoch of terrestrial planet formation. Though current simulations of terrestrial accretion can reproduce many observed qualities of the solar system, replicating the small mass of Mars requires modification to standard planet formation models. Here we use direct numerical simulations to show that an early instability in the outer solar system regularly yields properly sized Mars analogues. In 80% of simulations, we produce a Mars of the appropriate mass. Our most successful outcomes occur when the terrestrial planets evolve 10 million years (Myr), and accrete several Mars sized embryos in the Mars forming region before the instability takes place. Mars is left behind as a stranded embryo, while the remainder of these bodies are either ejected from the system or scattered towards the inner solar system where they deliver water to Earth. An early giant planet instability can thus replicate both the inner and outer solar system in a single model.
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Communication dans un congrès
American Astronomical Society, DPS meeting #49, id.#508.04, Oct 2017, Provo, UTA, United States
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https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01619299
Contributeur : Marie-Paule Pomies <>
Soumis le : jeudi 19 octobre 2017 - 11:30:33
Dernière modification le : jeudi 11 janvier 2018 - 06:28:10

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Matthew Clement, Nathan A. Kaib, Sean N. Raymond, Kevin J. Walsh. Mars’ Growth Stunted by an Early Giant Planet Instability. American Astronomical Society, DPS meeting #49, id.#508.04, Oct 2017, Provo, UTA, United States. 〈hal-01619299〉

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