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Behavioral adjustments of African herbivores to predation risk by lions: Spatiotemporal variations influence habitat use

Abstract : Predators may influence their prey populations not only through direct lethal effects, but also through indirect behavioral changes. Here, we combined spatiotemporal finescale data from GPS radio collars on lions with habitat use information on 11 African herbivores in Hwange National Park (Zimbabwe) to test whether the risk of predation by lions influenced the distribution of herbivores in the landscape. Effects of long-term risk of predation (likelihood of lion presence calculated over four months) and short-term risk of predation (actual presence of lions in the vicinity in the preceding 24 hours) were contrasted. The long-term risk of predation by lions appeared to influence the distributions of all browsers across the landscape, but not of grazers. This result strongly suggests that browsers and grazers, which face different ecological constraints, are influenced at different spatial and temporal scales in the variation of the risk of predation by lions. The results also show that all herbivores tend to use more open habitats preferentially when lions are in their vicinity, probably an effective anti-predator behavior against such an ambush predator. Behaviorally induced effects of lions may therefore contribute significantly to structuring African herbivore communities, and hence possibly their effects on savanna ecosystems.
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https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00527125
Contributor : Martine Lacalle <>
Submitted on : Monday, October 18, 2010 - 11:16:43 AM
Last modification on : Tuesday, July 20, 2021 - 5:20:04 PM

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Marion Valeix, A.J. Loveridge, Simon Chamaillé-Jammes, Z. Davidson, F. Murindagomo, et al.. Behavioral adjustments of African herbivores to predation risk by lions: Spatiotemporal variations influence habitat use. Ecology, Ecological Society of America, 2009, 90 (1), pp.23-30. ⟨10.1890/08-0606.1⟩. ⟨hal-00527125⟩

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