Cyclopiazonic acid and thapsigargin reduce Ca2+ influx in frog skeletal muscle fibres as a result of Ca2+ store depletion

Abstract : We have investigated the influence of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ content on the retrograde control of skeletal muscle L-type Ca2+ channels activity by ryanodine receptors (RyR). The effects of cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) and thapsigargin (TG), two structurally unrelated inhibitors of SR Ca(2+)-adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase), were examined on the SR Ca2+ content, the calcium current and contraction in single frog semitendinosus fibres using the double mannitol-gap technique. At moderate concentrations that only partially inhibited Ca2+ sequestration by the SR, CPA (2-4 microM) induces a concentration dependent depression of contraction and Ca2+ current amplitudes. When Ba2+ is the charge carrier, the inward current is not changed by CPA suggesting that this Ca(2+)-pump inhibitor does not directly affect dihydropyridine Ca2+ channels. Similar effects were obtained with TG (1-5 microM). Changes in Ca2+ currents and contraction were accompanied by a reduced Ca2+ loading of the SR. We attribute the modulation of the Ca2+ current to the selective inhibition of the SR Ca2+ ATPase, resulting in a decreased Ca2+ release and thereby a reduced activation of calcium inward currents. This is therefore taken to represent a calcium release-dependent modulation of skeletal muscle L-type Ca2+ channels.
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W. Même, C Léoty. Cyclopiazonic acid and thapsigargin reduce Ca2+ influx in frog skeletal muscle fibres as a result of Ca2+ store depletion. Acta Physiologica Scandinavica, Wiley-Blackwell, 2001, 173 (4), pp.391-399. ⟨10.1046/j.1365-201X.2001.00918.x⟩. ⟨hal-02149096⟩

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