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Les musiciens aveugles itinérants au Japon du Moyen Âge au XXe siècle : entre « culture de la cécité » et culture populaire

Abstract : In Japan, blindness has been associated with music since ancient times. Blind musicians have at the same time inspired many fictional characters in popular culture and brought a major contribution to Japan’s musical and literary history. This paper is a literature review aimed at exploring why and how the figure of the blind musician has made its mark on Japan’s historical imaginary. The word “blind” used in this text is not meant as a medical category aimed at defining people by their visual capacities, but as a category of the cultural imaginary that tends to include these people in a shared destiny. The article shows that the various figures of blind musicians in Japanese history are partly the product of self-definitions by the blind communities themselves, who endeavoured to construct and obtain recognition of a specific identity. It highlights lived experiences of visual impairment that do not always equate to today’s understanding of disability.
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https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-02502957
Contributor : Anne-Lise Mithout Connect in order to contact the contributor
Submitted on : Monday, March 9, 2020 - 4:16:19 PM
Last modification on : Thursday, November 18, 2021 - 3:46:17 AM

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  • HAL Id : hal-02502957, version 1

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Anne-Lise Mithout. Les musiciens aveugles itinérants au Japon du Moyen Âge au XXe siècle : entre « culture de la cécité » et culture populaire. Canadian Journal of Disability Studies, Canadian Disability Studies Associaion, 2019, Cécité et création, 8 (6). ⟨hal-02502957⟩

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