Knowing and Being Known. Approaching Australian Indigenous Tourism through Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Politics of Knowing

Abstract : Based on ethnographic research conducted with Bardi and Jawi people, an Indigenous group from the Northwestern Kimberley region of Western Australia, the aim of this paper is to approach the complexities related to Indigenous tourism in Australia through the politics of knowing and not-knowing as embodied by Indigenous tour guides and non-Indigenous tourists. It examines the notion of knowing (or not knowing) and its usages by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in the context of their tourist encounter. 'Knowing' represents an important aspect through which Aboriginal people and their non-Indigenous guests negotiate their interactions. In particular, the paper shows how Indigenous and non-Indigenous expectations from tourism lead actors to adopt divergent positions and to assert renewed claims in relation to knowledge or knowing, casting new light on issues of self-representation and empowerment in the domain of Indigenous tourism.
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Céline Travési. Knowing and Being Known. Approaching Australian Indigenous Tourism through Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Politics of Knowing. Anthropological Forum: A Journal of Social Anthropology and Comparative Sociology, Taylor & Francis (Routledge), 2018, 28 (3), pp.275-292. ⟨10.1080/00664677.2018.1486285⟩. ⟨hal-02468143⟩

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