The First Anatomically Modern Humans from South-Eastern Europe. Contributions from the Buran-Kaya III Site (Crimea)

Abstract : The arrival of modern humans into Europe, their dispersal and their potential interactions with Neanderthals are still in debate. Whereas the first appearance of anatomically modern humans in Western Europe seems to be well understood, the situation is quite different for Eastern Europe, where data are more scarce. The Buran-Kaya III site in Crimea is of key importance to understand the colonization of Europe by anatomically modern humans and their potential contemporaneity with the last Neanderthal occupations. The new radiocarbon dated sequence shows that no Neanderthal settlement existed after 39 ka cal BP and casts doubt on the survival, as previously proposed, of Neanderthal refuge zones in Crimea 28 ka BP ago (34-32 ka cal BP). The human remains from Buran-Kaya III, directly dated to 32450 +250/-230 BP (layer 6-2) and 31900+/-220 BP (layer 6-1) (37.1-35.7 ka cal BP and 36.3-35.2 cal BP respectively), represent some of the oldest evidence of anatomically modern humans in Europe in a unique welldocumented archaeological context (Gravettian). Furthermore, the specimens from layer 6-1 represent the oldest Upper Palaeolithic modern humans from Eastern Europe with evidence of post-mortem treatment of the dead.
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https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-02263809
Contributor : Anne-Lise Millan-Brun <>
Submitted on : Monday, August 5, 2019 - 5:17:31 PM
Last modification on : Wednesday, August 7, 2019 - 1:16:49 AM

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  • HAL Id : hal-02263809, version 1

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S. Prat, S. Péan, L. Crépin, S. Puaud, D.G. Drucker, et al.. The First Anatomically Modern Humans from South-Eastern Europe. Contributions from the Buran-Kaya III Site (Crimea). Bulletins et Mémoires de la Société d'anthropologie de Paris, Springer Verlag, 2018, pp.169-179. ⟨hal-02263809⟩

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