Les effets de l’indépendance d’Haïti sur la société esclavagiste martiniquaise sous le Consulat et l’Empire (1802-1809)

Abstract : The Pearl of the West Indies was the most prosperous plantation colony of the French colonial empire until 1791. The influence of the French Revolution was about to affect this colony’s destiny forever, as well as the New World’s. The numerous civil and military conflicts, the appearance of a « black » elite to power and the abolition of slavery result in the independence of Haiti within fourteen years. The revolutionary process affects the Whites’ position in the French, English, Spanish and Danish settlements. Some of the colonies prefer to preserve the former political system while eliminating the « revolutionary » individuals by deporting or killing them. Martinique gives a striking example of this with the British occupation in 1794, which ended the revolutionary process. The White Creole elite was reinforced and preserved. In 1802, Bonaparte’s colonial policy kept up the British dynamic (slavery and segregation were maintained). Yet, the Whites feared the slaves would rise up against the pro-slavery order.
Complete list of metadatas

https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-02168207
Contributor : Alexis Darbon <>
Submitted on : Friday, June 28, 2019 - 2:59:29 PM
Last modification on : Saturday, June 29, 2019 - 1:25:58 AM

Licence


Distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial - NoDerivatives 4.0 International License

Links full text

Identifiers

Collections

Citation

Lionel Trani. Les effets de l’indépendance d’Haïti sur la société esclavagiste martiniquaise sous le Consulat et l’Empire (1802-1809). La Révolution française - Cahiers de l’Institut d’histoire de la Révolution française, Institut d'Histoire de la Révolution française, 2019, 1801-1840 – Haïti, entre Indépendance et Restauration, ⟨10.4000/lrf.2923⟩. ⟨hal-02168207⟩

Share

Metrics

Record views

48