L'impossible sortie de guerre des mandats australasiens : Les Samoa et la Nouvelle-Guinée (1918-1939)

Abstract : At the Paris Peace Conference, Australia and New Zealand obtained League of Nations mandates for two German colonies they were occupying since 1914, Samoa and the Territory of New Guinea. During the Interwar, both dominions stood apart other mandatory powers by their desire to favour the military at all level of colonial administration as well as for private colonisation, which gave rise to recurring accusations of militarism, and hindered the application of the colonial policy focused on socio-economical development of Pacific Islanders that the mandate required. Induced by veterans’ lobbying, popular and governmental disinterest for those new gained territories, and a permanent uncertainty about the mandates’ permanency, this particularism stemmed from the ambiguous character of Australasian imperialism, promoted by a minority eager for those two developing nations to attain the rank of fully-fledged “European” power by acquiring their own colonies, while most Australasians were perfectly satisfied with being an autonomous component of the British Empire.
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https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01979629
Contributor : Gwendal Rannou <>
Submitted on : Sunday, January 13, 2019 - 4:15:36 PM
Last modification on : Saturday, March 16, 2019 - 1:53:36 AM

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  • HAL Id : hal-01979629, version 1

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Gwendal Rannou. L'impossible sortie de guerre des mandats australasiens : Les Samoa et la Nouvelle-Guinée (1918-1939). Outre-Mers Revue d'Histoire, Société française d'histoire d'outre-mer, 2018, Sortir de la guerre dans les empires, 400-401, pp.189-212. ⟨hal-01979629⟩

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