Bacteriome genetic structures of urban deposits are indicative of their origin and impacted by chemical pollutants

Abstract : Urban activities generate surface deposits over impervious surfaces that can represent ecological and health hazards. Bacteriome genetic structures of deposits washed off during rainfall events, over an urban industrial watershed, were inferred from 16S rRNA gene (rrs) sequences generated by high throughput sequencing. Deposits were sampled over a 4 year-period from a detention basin (DB). Major shifts, matching key management practices, in the structure of these urban bacteriomes, were recorded. Correlation analyses of rrs similarities between samples and their respective concentrations in chemical pollutants, markers of human fecal contaminations (HF183) and antimicrobial resistances (integrons), were performed. Harsher environmental constraints building up in the older deposits led to an increase number of rrs reads from extremophiles such as Acidibacter and Haliangium. Deposits accumulating in the decantation pit of the DB showed an increase in rrs reads from warm blooded intestinal tract bacteria such as Bacteroides and Prevotella. This enrichment matched higher concentrations of Bacteroides HF183 genotypes normally restricted to humans. Bacteriomes of urban deposits appeared good indicators of human-driven environmental changes. Their composition was found representative of their origin. Soil particles and rain appeared to be major contributors of the inferred bacterial taxa recovered from recent deposits.
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Submitted on : Thursday, November 23, 2017 - 11:45:28 AM
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Romain Marti, Céline Becouze-Lareure, Sébastien Ribun, Laure Marjolet, Claire Bernardin Souibgui, et al.. Bacteriome genetic structures of urban deposits are indicative of their origin and impacted by chemical pollutants. Scientific Reports, Nature Publishing Group, 2017, 7 (1), pp.Article Number: 13219. ⟨10.1038/s41598-017-13594-8⟩. ⟨hal-01646114⟩

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