The Function of Late Neolithic Long Blades and Daggers in Western Europe: An Assessment Based on Use-Wear Analysis of Grand-Pressigny Flint Productions

Abstract : From the fourth millennium bc onward, flint dagger and long-blade workshops developed throughout Europe. Upper Turonian flint from the Grand-Pressigny region (western-central France) is one of the most emblematic examples of this type of lithic production from the end of the Neolithic. The function of long blades is poorly known and subject to debate. A sample of long blades and daggers was thus selected for microwear analysis, in order to record the technical tool functions of these remarkable productions from the end of the West European Neolithic. The main aim of this study is to determine whether these artifacts show any traces coming from use as tools for ordinary daily tasks, or whether they do not show wear-traces and could be interpreted as socially valued objects with no technical utility.
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Submitted on : Friday, May 19, 2017 - 3:52:32 PM
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Jimmy Linton. The Function of Late Neolithic Long Blades and Daggers in Western Europe: An Assessment Based on Use-Wear Analysis of Grand-Pressigny Flint Productions. Lithic Technology, Taylor & Francis online, 2016, 41 (3), pp.236 - 246. ⟨10.1080/01977261.2016.1201968⟩. ⟨hal-01525203⟩

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