HAL will be down for maintenance from Friday, June 10 at 4pm through Monday, June 13 at 9am. More information
Skip to Main content Skip to Navigation
Journal articles

Why vocal production of atypical sounds in apes and its cerebral correlates have a lot to say about the origin of language

Abstract : Ackermann et al. mention the ``acquisition of species-atypical sounds'' in apes without any discussion. In our commentary, we demonstrate that these atypical sounds in chimpanzees not only include laryngeal sounds, but also have a major significance regarding the origins of language, if we consider looking at their context of use, their social properties, their relations with gestures, their lateralization, and their neurofunctional correlates as well.
Document type :
Journal articles
Complete list of metadata

https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01432469
Contributor : Jean-Baptiste Melmi Connect in order to contact the contributor
Submitted on : Wednesday, January 11, 2017 - 5:00:22 PM
Last modification on : Tuesday, October 19, 2021 - 10:58:52 PM

Links full text

Identifiers

Collections

Citation

Adrien Meguerditchian, Jared P. Taglialatela, David A. Leavens, William D. Hopkins. Why vocal production of atypical sounds in apes and its cerebral correlates have a lot to say about the origin of language. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, Cambridge University Press (CUP), 2014, 37 (6), ⟨10.1017/S0140525X13004135⟩. ⟨hal-01432469⟩

Share

Metrics

Record views

59