Land use change and its impact on the conservation of wild Elephas maximus in China during the past 40 years

Abstract : In the past four decades, China has undergone major economic changes, most notably in the tea and rubber industries, as well as experienced considerable variation in wildlife populations and habitats. We used vegetation sample points to classify the Landsat images of Elephas maximus (Asian elephant) distribution areas in China in 1975, 1990, 2005, and 2014. We then used the land use transfer matrix method to analyze changes in the distribution of the Asian elephant in the last 10 years. Results showed that rubber cultivation areas increased the most from 202 km2 to 4,930 km2, and tea plantations increased from 3,389 km2 to 8,539 km2. Forest area declined by 4,355 km2, and farmland area was reduced by 5,661 km2. Given these trends, balancing Asian elephant conservation and rural development has become challenge to conservationists. In addition, the effectiveness of forest conservation policies during the past 20 years is questionable because the expansion of cash forest was mistaken as afforestation. New strategies should be explored, including the eco-compensation mechanism for reforestation and the mixed agroforestry system. Restoring elephant habitat and establishing ecological corridors are critical for the survival of elephants in this region.
Liste complète des métadonnées

https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01366297
Contributor : Patrick Giraudoux <>
Submitted on : Wednesday, September 14, 2016 - 2:03:32 PM
Last modification on : Thursday, September 15, 2016 - 1:05:14 AM

Identifiers

  • HAL Id : hal-01366297, version 1

Collections

Citation

Peng Liu, Hui Wen, Franziska Harich, Changhuan He, Lanxin Wang, et al.. Land use change and its impact on the conservation of wild Elephas maximus in China during the past 40 years. Research and methods in ecohealth and conservation, GDRI Ecosystem Health and Environmental Disease Ecology, Nov 2016, Kunming, China. ⟨hal-01366297⟩

Share

Metrics

Record views

141