Evidence for early irrigation at Bat (Wadi Sharsah, northwestern Oman) before the advent of farming villages

Abstract : Decades of archaeological research in southeastern Arabia (Oman and the UAE) have provided a good understanding of the evolution of human societies in this arid region, with the transition from mobile pastoralism to settled agricultural villages occurring at the start of the Hafit period (ca. 3100–2700 BCE). The delayed adoption of farming, ceramics, mudbrick architecture, metallurgy, and other technologies until the start of the 3rd millennium BCE has been a particularly salient feature of this region relative to its neighbours in Mesopotamia, southern Iran, and northwestern South Asia. However, recent geoarchaeological research at the World Heritage Site of Bat, situated within the Wadi Sharsah valley in northwest Oman, has provided evidence of irrigation practices that have been dated to the early-mid 4th millennium BCE. While direct evidence of farming from this early period remains elusive, the presence of irrigated fields at this time raises new questions about the supposedly mobile pastoralist groups of the Arabian Neolithic and the beginning of farming practices in the region.
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Quaternary Science Reviews, Elsevier, 2016, 150, pp.42-54. 〈10.1016/j.quascirev.2016.08.007〉
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https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01357928
Contributeur : Desruelles Stéphane <>
Soumis le : mardi 30 août 2016 - 16:20:21
Dernière modification le : vendredi 5 octobre 2018 - 13:42:41

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ENEC | ASM | UPMC

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Stéphane Desruelles, Eric Fouache, Eddargach Wassel, Cécilia Cammas, Julia Wattez, et al.. Evidence for early irrigation at Bat (Wadi Sharsah, northwestern Oman) before the advent of farming villages. Quaternary Science Reviews, Elsevier, 2016, 150, pp.42-54. 〈10.1016/j.quascirev.2016.08.007〉. 〈hal-01357928〉

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