Importance of Integration and Implementation of Emerging and Future Mercury Research into the Minamata Convention

Abstract : [début du texte} Since the Industrial Revolution, and before, human actions have enhanced the production and emissions of mercury (Hg), as well as climate changing gases (ozone, nitrous oxide, methane, and carbon dioxide). Burning of fossil fuels, mining, and other human activities, have increased the cycling of Hg at the Earth’s surface (by at least 200%), increasing human and wildlife exposure.
Document type :
Journal articles
Complete list of metadatas

Cited literature [9 references]  Display  Hide  Download

https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01337321
Contributor : Paco Bustamante <>
Submitted on : Thursday, February 2, 2017 - 7:33:21 AM
Last modification on : Friday, August 9, 2019 - 11:22:02 AM
Long-term archiving on : Friday, May 5, 2017 - 1:35:13 PM

File

Gustin et al 2016 EST.pdf
Files produced by the author(s)

Identifiers

Collections

Citation

Mae Sexauer Gustin, David C. Evers, Michael S Bank, Chad Hammerschmidt, Ashley Pierce, et al.. Importance of Integration and Implementation of Emerging and Future Mercury Research into the Minamata Convention. Environmental Science & Technology, American Chemical Society, 2016, 50, pp.2767−2770. ⟨10.1021/acs.est.6b00573⟩. ⟨hal-01337321⟩

Share

Metrics

Record views

209

Files downloads

226