The controversial management of fire in the national forests of Idaho and western Montana : The case of the montane zone dominated by ponderosa pines and Douglas-firs

Abstract : In Idaho and Montana just like in the rest of the U.S. Rocky Mountains, a part of the population wants to settle near forests perceived as environmental amenities. The regional net migration has been positive for about twenty-five years. Wildfires with variable intensity regularly destroy properties. Some of them kill people. Regionally, they are an important human, economic, political and environmental issue. Their significance is likely to increase due to global warming. A lot of these fires are ignited within the huge national forests of the montane zone (600 to 2,100 meters of elevation in the study area) dominated by Ponderosa pines and Douglas firs. Between the end of the conquest of the West and the 1970s, land uses have altered these forests and the fire regimes that affect them. For about four decades, managers have been involved in a partial and controversial restoration of pre-conquest fire regimes and forests they used to shape.
Liste complète des métadonnées

Cited literature [8 references]  Display  Hide  Download

https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01224560
Contributor : Nicolas Barbier <>
Submitted on : Thursday, November 5, 2015 - 3:18:39 PM
Last modification on : Thursday, March 7, 2019 - 11:20:06 AM

File

Article_Fire.pdf
Publisher files allowed on an open archive

Identifiers

Citation

Nicolas Barbier. The controversial management of fire in the national forests of Idaho and western Montana : The case of the montane zone dominated by ponderosa pines and Douglas-firs. Revue de Géographie Alpine / Journal of Alpine Research, Association pour la diffusion de la recherche alpine, 2015, ⟨https://rga.revues.org/2696⟩. ⟨10.4000/rga.2696⟩. ⟨hal-01224560⟩

Share

Metrics

Record views

404

Files downloads

369