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A general method for manipulating DNA sequences from any organism with optical tweezers.

Abstract : Mechanical manipulation of single DNA molecules can provide novel information about DNA properties and protein-DNA interactions. Here we describe and characterize a useful method for manipulating desired DNA sequences from any organism with optical tweezers. Molecules are produced from either genomic or cloned DNA by PCR using labeled primers and are tethered between two optically trapped microspheres. We demonstrate that human, insect, plant, bacterial and viral sequences ranging from approximately 10 to 40 kilobasepairs can be manipulated. Force-extension measurements show that these constructs exhibit uniform elastic properties in accord with the expected contour lengths for the targeted sequences. Detailed protocols for preparing and manipulating these molecules are presented, and tethering efficiency is characterized as a function of DNA concentration, ionic strength and pH. Attachment strength is characterized by measuring the unbinding time as a function of applied force. An alternative stronger attachment method using an amino-carboxyl linkage, which allows for reliable DNA overstretching, is also described.
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https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01131462
Contributor : Aurélie Dupont <>
Submitted on : Friday, March 13, 2015 - 4:06:36 PM
Last modification on : Wednesday, June 10, 2020 - 7:22:04 PM

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Derek N Fuller, Gregory J Gemmen, John Peter Rickgauer, Aurélie Dupont, Rachel Millin, et al.. A general method for manipulating DNA sequences from any organism with optical tweezers.. Nucleic Acids Research, Oxford University Press, 2005, 34 (2), pp.e15. ⟨hal-01131462⟩

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