Subjective and objective workload: a different impact on performance due to situation complexity and driving practice?

Abstract : The aim of the present study is to identify the effects of subjective and objective workload on driving performance, as a function of situation complexity and driving practice. Driving performance can be maintained even in complex situations, when compensatory strategies are set up with practice to reduce the level of workload. However, when the situation is low demanding, or inversely high demanding, the level of workload is too high, and performance is impaired, notably for novice drivers who have a lack of driving automation. Our main hypothesis is thus that the increase of situation complexity and the lack of experience increase both subjective and objective workload, leading to performance impairments. Thirty-two young drivers (16 novice drivers who obtained their driving license within the last two months aged 18, and 16 drivers arriving at the end of the three-year probationary period and aged 21) were randomly assigned to three situations (simple, moderately complex and very complex) in a driving simulator. In each situation, three scenarios implied a pedestrian who crossed the road in front of the participant. Self-reported levels of workload during the pedestrian crossings were collected by the NASA-TLX questionnaire between each situation. Objective workload was assessed by the differential heart rate between rest periods (10 min between each situation) and driving periods. Driving performance corresponded to the number of collisions with the pedestrians. Four binomial regressions analyses are undergoing: the effect of situation complexity and driving experience on subjective workload, the effect of situation complexity and driving experience on objective workload, the effect of subjective workload on driving performance, and the effect of objective workload on driving performance. The comparison between subjective and objective data will reveal if drivers overvalued or undervalued their physiological state. Moreover, it will indicate if drivers were more influenced by their physiological state or by their feeling, as a function of situation complexity and driving experience. The first results will be presented and will be useful to improve driving training.
Type de document :
Communication dans un congrès
ICAP 2014, 28th International Congress of Applied Psychology, Jul 2014, France
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https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01065673
Contributeur : Ifsttar Cadic <>
Soumis le : jeudi 18 septembre 2014 - 13:37:48
Dernière modification le : mercredi 14 décembre 2016 - 01:00:30

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  • HAL Id : hal-01065673, version 1

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Julie Paxion, Catherine Berthelon, Edith Galy, Thomas Arciszewski. Subjective and objective workload: a different impact on performance due to situation complexity and driving practice?. ICAP 2014, 28th International Congress of Applied Psychology, Jul 2014, France. 〈hal-01065673〉

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