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Optimisation of the shear stress transfer in structural bonded assemblies using a curved bonded joint geometry

Abstract : Structural adhesive bonding is coming into increasing use in civil engineering either for strengthening operations involving the adhesive bonding of external reinforcements or to replace traditional assembly techniques in new structures. However adhesive bonding induces stress concentrations at the edges of the joint, which have been studied by a large number of researchers in order to reduce these phenomena and increase the capacity and service life of the assembly. These studies are all, therefore, concerned with optimizing shear stress transfer in adhesively bonded joints. This paper investigates the role of the hydrostatic pressure on the ultimate capacities of common civil engineering adhesives. This led us to investigate a new joint geometry, the ‘‘curved” bonded joint that naturally creates compressive stresses on the edge of the joint. Initially, classical modelling is conducted to determine how the geometry affects the stresses in the joint. Then, fracture mechanics is used to investigate crack propagation. After this theoretical modelling, several experimental investigations are presented. These are quasi-static tests which compare classical shear lap joints to curved joints. The experimental results are then exploited using the modelling described before. Additional testing is currently in progress, but the curved bonded joint seems to hold good prospects and a patent has been filed.
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https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00526094
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Submitted on : Wednesday, October 13, 2010 - 4:20:07 PM
Last modification on : Monday, February 17, 2020 - 5:47:28 PM

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  • HAL Id : hal-00526094, version 1

Citation

Sylvain Chataigner, Jean-François Caron. Optimisation of the shear stress transfer in structural bonded assemblies using a curved bonded joint geometry. Construction and Building Materials, Elsevier, 2010. ⟨hal-00526094⟩

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