A microstructural imprint of melt impregnation in slow spreading lithosphere: Olivine-rich troctolites from the Atlantis Massif, Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 30 degrees N, IODP Hole U1309D

Abstract : The 1415 m deep IODP Hole U1309D (Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 30 degrees N) is the second deepest hole drilled into slow spreading oceanic lithosphere. The recovered section comprises essentially gabbroic rocks, with a large range of compositions. The most primitive end-members of the gabbroic sequence, herein referred to as olivine-rich troctolites (ol > similar to 70%), have textures and geochemical compositions intermediate between that of mantle peridotites and primitive cumulates, indicative of melt impregnation processes. We carried out a detailed microstructural study to further characterize the petrogenetic processes leading to their formation, as well as discuss their mode of emplacement and relationship with neighboring mantle lithosphere. In olivine-rich troctolites, olivines range from coarse-grained subhedral crystals, commonly containing well-developed subgrains, to medium-grained rounded crystals with fewer or no substructures. They are embedded in large, undeformed pyroxene and plagioclase poikiloblasts. Olivine substructures reveal dislocation creep that is consistent with activation of the main high-temperature slip systems, dominantly (010)[100]. Olivine crystallographic preferred orientation is very weak but generally shows a relatively stronger, uncommon [001] concentration. These unusual olivine fabrics are interpreted as resulting from melt impregnation of a previously deformed olivine matrix: the solid olivine framework is disrupted by olivine corrosion along grain and subgrain boundaries, and the high-temperature plastic fabric is modified in a liquid-dominated regime. Based on mineral composition and fabrics and in comparison with what is observed in impregnated mantle rocks elsewhere, we posit that olivine represents relicts of mantle peridotites disaggregated by large melt influx, although the mantle origin of olivine is not unequivocally demonstrated yet. Whatever the initial lithology, impregnation by large volumes of melt has strongly modified the original composition and microstructure. If the mantle origin hypothesis is correct, the original olivine fabric could have been efficiently weakened by dunitization prior to disruption of the olivine framework by melt impregnation. Incorporation, at the base of the lithosphere, of small slivers of impregnated dunite into gabbroic sections, trapped between successive igneous units, may be a common mechanism of lower crustal accretion at slow spreading ridges. Extensive melt-rock interaction processes are expected to contribute significantly to the final chemical composition of erupted lavas.
Complete list of metadatas

https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00496391
Contributor : Gm Aigle <>
Submitted on : Wednesday, June 30, 2010 - 2:59:27 PM
Last modification on : Wednesday, April 24, 2019 - 3:26:04 PM

Links full text

Identifiers

Citation

Marion Drouin, Benoit Ildefonse, Marguerite Godard. A microstructural imprint of melt impregnation in slow spreading lithosphere: Olivine-rich troctolites from the Atlantis Massif, Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 30 degrees N, IODP Hole U1309D. Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, AGU and the Geochemical Society, 2010, 11, pp.Q06003. ⟨10.1029/2009GC002995⟩. ⟨hal-00496391⟩

Share

Metrics

Record views

412